Radioactive isotopes as a boon

Radioactive isotopes- boon or a bane Radioactivity is the spontaneous emission of energy from unstable atoms.

Radioactive isotopes as a boon

Before we go into discussing radioactive isotopes, let's recall what an isotope is. Let's look at the picture of an atom below - it has a nucleus made up of protons and neutrons, with electrons around the nucleus. All the atoms of an element have the same number of protons, but the number of their neutrons can differ.

If this happens, then we can call these isotopes of an element. Isotopes have the same number of protons, but they differ in the number of neutrons. Made of Protons and Neutrons For instance, below, we have the isotopes of hydrogen.

Here, you can see that the number of protons and electrons are the same, but for the three isotopes of hydrogen, the number of neutrons differ. Isotopes of Hydrogen Now that we recalled what isotopes are, what makes them radioactive?

When I think about the word 'radioactive', I think about a unique and unstable type of energy. If an isotope has an unstable nucleus that breaks down to emit radiation, then these are what we call radioactive isotopes, also known as radioisotopes.

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Radioactive isotopes have an unstable nucleus that decays or emits excess energy or radiation until the nucleus becomes stable. They can be naturally occurring or artificial isotopes of an element.

Uses of Radioactive Isotopes There are about 50 naturally occurring radioactive isotopes, and the rest are artificial. We probably don't know all of the many uses these radioactive isotopes have, or the benefits they bring in various fields.

Radioactive isotopes as a boon

What are the uses of these radioactive isotopes? Medicine There are many radioactive isotopes that are very beneficial in applications in medicine. For instance, radioactive isotopes are used for radiation therapy, and for locating brain tumors.

If for instance, you need to keep track of activities of your organs, radioactive isotopes are also used here. Below is a table of some radioactive isotopes and their applications in medicine.

It is very unpleasant, so to minimize food borne illnesses and food poisoning experiences, food needs to be treated. To do this, it has to undergo irradiation, which commonly uses radioactive isotopes of cobalt Symbol Indicating Food was Treated with Radiation Besides preventing illness, irradiating food can help it stay fresher longer because it gets rid of microorganisms and bacteria that cause early spoilage.Every chemical element has one or more radioactive isotopes.

Radioactive isotopes a boon or curse wikipedia

For example, hydrogen, the lightest element, has three isotopes with mass numbers 1, 2, and 3. Only hydrogen-3, however, is a radioactive isotope, the other two being stable.

More than 1, radioactive isotopes of . Radioactive Isotopes A Boon For Society. REVIEW VOCABULARY REVIEW radioactive isotope is an isotope whose nucleus tends to release particles, radiant energy, or both; radioactive dating is a technique for determining the age of a material by measuring the amount of a particular radioactive isotope the material contains.

Radioactive Isotopes As A Boon. REVIEW VOCABULARY REVIEW radioactive isotope is an isotope whose nucleus tends to release particles, radiant energy, or both; radioactive dating is a technique for determining the age of a material by measuring the amount of a .

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Radioactive isotopes are atoms with unstable atomic nuclei, and they emit energy and particles from the nucleus to tranmute (change) themselves into stable isotopes.

Is the radioactive isotope a boon or a curse

Atomic energy a boon or a curse? I think it's like many other things man has invented: fire, the wheel, aircraft, for example, they can all be used for good and bad, which means.

Such isotopes or their compounds are called "radioactive tracers." For example, in order to find out if blood is circulating to a wound or not, a radioactive isotope is introduced into the body, and after a suitable time, some quantity of the blood is taken from the wound, and its radioactivity is calculated using a Geiger-Muller Counter.

Is the radioactive isotope a boon or a curse